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Australian Swallow

Welcome Swallow: Hirundo neoxena (other names: Australian Swallow, House Swallow): The swallow builds a cup-shaped mud nest in open sheds, under eaves and anywhere it can attach the nest and have shelter. Seeing any nests brings to mind the work involved for the birds. Their beaks are small and carrying

Duck parents and duckling

Wood duck (Maned Duck, Mained Goose): they mate for life. Breeding occurs in spring and its onset is said to depend on rain. Ducklings are led to water on emergency. When disturbed, the the mother flaps her wings and heads off in the opposite direction to distract the perceived threat. If they are not

Town and country pets

It’s nearly 10 year ago that the documentary Pedigree dogs exposed caused wide spread outrage in the media and among dog lovers. The documentary focused on the obsession in purebred dog breeders to produce exaggerated physical traits in show breeds, leading to severe physical disorders in certain breeds. I personally never

Humans’ best friend in mental health support

by Heike Hahner Many of us feel a deep connection with animals. We enjoy their company and are endlessly fascinated by their behaviours and  their interactions with us. We have also known for decades to utilise this beneficial connection  with us by recruiting, especially dogs, as therapy and support dogs in hospitals and nursing homes, as

Braidwood Rounds: Dogs with attitude

with Jill McLeod Occasionally the reputation of a town and its surrounding district is closely associated with the personalities of the dogs that take up residence within its confines. Braidwood is such a town together with its surrounding villages. Residents and visitors find themselves greeting the dogs before they acknowledge the presence

Wildlife Moves

 Sometimes wildlife gets into the wrong place... We all know about possums in the roof and the difficulty in removing them. Over the last few months, Wildcare has been called out to capture and relocate a number of wombats that had moved into the Queanbeyan suburbs. Left alone, and after some time,

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