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Save the planet, it’s the only one with beer

beer drinkers toasting

Severe droughts and extreme heat threaten to deplete barley yields, making beer rarer and more expensive, an international study has shown.  Depending on severity of the weather, yield losses are expected to be between 3 and 17 percent, but the authors expect this will mean crops are prioritised for essential goods

The dirt on SOIL

Pooping for the planet: Part II BACK IN THE early years of my academic career I worked in a university department with a number of soil scientists. ‘Soilies’ are, generally speaking, affable types who wear sturdy boots and get inordinately excited about digging holes in paddocks. In their natural environment they tend

Pooping for the planet: Part I

poultry manure

Ask not what the soil can do for you; ask what you can do for the soil. ONE OF THE greatest crimes committed by modern western society is that we use potable water to dispose of what is regarded as waste. Manure, dung, excrement, shit – call it what you will,

Safeguard and conserve what we have

NEW report: Hot, Dry& Deadly: NSW plants, animals (including humans) face ultimate challenge Review by Frankie Seymour Hot, Dry& Deadly: Impacts of Climate Change on Nature in NSW is a clear and concise document launched regionally last month by the Nature Conservation Council of NSW, a peak organisation representing 160 member organisations. The

Why are we stuck on climate change action?

Shadow Minister Mark Butler explains the Australian federal policy sink hole Climate Wars Mark Butler Melbourne University Press, 2017. Book review by Nick Goldie As Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy, Mark Butler could be expected to come up with the goods in his new book Climate Wars. And that’s just what he does:

Major supermarkets pledge phase-out of one-use plastic bags

Every second, 159 single-use plastic bags are used in Australia – more than 10 million new bags each day. In NSW, up to 61 million bags are littered each year. More than 70 per cent of the rubbish entering our oceans is identified as plastic. Plastic kills up to one million sea birds, countless fish and 100,000 sea mammals each year. These figures, supplied

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